Glasite Church

Also Known As

Notes

A neo-Calvinist sect of literalist Christianity.

The doctrines professed were taken literally from the Scriptures of the Bible and only Psalms were sung. Elders were chosen by the marks given in Timothy 3:1-7 and the law of discipline (Matthew 18:15-17) was strictly observed as a means of preserving peace and unity in the Church. Eating of blood, the use of oaths as between brethren, the use of the lot for frivolous purposes, and the covetous accumulation of riches were all strictly forbidden and members took no part in worship with any not accepting these scriptural doctrines.

The casting of lots was sacred because after the Crucifixion, lots were cast by the Soldiers for the garments of Christ and all games of chance, gambling, betting, playing cards, etc. were included and strictly forbidden.

There was also a ban on the eating of meat from animals that did not split the hoof, such as rabbits, and of game that had been shot. These doctrines were closely interpreted but in the course of time that became more moderate. In the early 1880s a split occurred in many of the Churches over differences of interpretation and the groups separated and no longer worshipped together.

Robert Sandeman, the founder's son-in-law, spread the faith into England and the United States of America, where members of the church were called Sandemanians.

Events

Date Known

20 February 1791

James Faraday makes his Confession of Faith to become a full member of the Sandemanian congregation in Paul's Alley, Barbican, England.

1862

London's Sandemanian congregation (including Michael Faraday) moves from Paul's Alley to Barnsbury Grove.

People

Locations

Sources